We applied species sensitivity distributions (SSDs), commonly used in chemical risk assessment, to quantify the impact of water-flow velocity on the presence of fish species in a river. SSDs for water-flow velocity were derived from observational field data (maximal velocity at which species occur, Vmax) and laboratory measurements (critical swimming velocity, Vcrit). By calculating the potentially affected fraction of the fish species of the river Rhine, effects of water-flow velocity on different life stages and guilds were estimated. Vmaxvalues for adults were significantly higher than those for juveniles and larvae. At water-flow velocity of 60cms-1, half of the adults were affected, while half of the non-adult life stages were affected at velocities of 25 to 29cms-1. There was a positive correlation between body size and fish tolerance to water-flow. As expected, rheophilic species tolerated higher water-flow velocities than eurytopic and limnophilic species. Maximal velocities measured in littoral zones of the Rhine were, on average, 10cms-1, corresponding to an affected fraction of 2%. An increase in water-flow velocity up to 120cms-1as a result of passing vessels caused an increase in affected species to 75%. For a successful ecological river management, the SSD method can be used to quantify the trait-mediated effects of water-flow alterations on occurring species enabling to compare and rank the effects of chemical and physical stress.

Size-Mediated Effects of Water-Flow Velocity on Riverine Fish Species

Mulder, C.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2016

Abstract

We applied species sensitivity distributions (SSDs), commonly used in chemical risk assessment, to quantify the impact of water-flow velocity on the presence of fish species in a river. SSDs for water-flow velocity were derived from observational field data (maximal velocity at which species occur, Vmax) and laboratory measurements (critical swimming velocity, Vcrit). By calculating the potentially affected fraction of the fish species of the river Rhine, effects of water-flow velocity on different life stages and guilds were estimated. Vmaxvalues for adults were significantly higher than those for juveniles and larvae. At water-flow velocity of 60cms-1, half of the adults were affected, while half of the non-adult life stages were affected at velocities of 25 to 29cms-1. There was a positive correlation between body size and fish tolerance to water-flow. As expected, rheophilic species tolerated higher water-flow velocities than eurytopic and limnophilic species. Maximal velocities measured in littoral zones of the Rhine were, on average, 10cms-1, corresponding to an affected fraction of 2%. An increase in water-flow velocity up to 120cms-1as a result of passing vessels caused an increase in affected species to 75%. For a successful ecological river management, the SSD method can be used to quantify the trait-mediated effects of water-flow alterations on occurring species enabling to compare and rank the effects of chemical and physical stress.
Allometry; Ecological risk assessment; Fish occurrence; Physical stress; Rivers; Environmental Chemistry; Water Science and Technology; 2300
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/322768
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 12
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact