Nowadays various technical solutions have been proposed in order to improve the performance of spark-ignition internal combustion engines both at part and full load operations, especially in terms of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). Among the most advanced technical solutions, a fully flexible valve control system (VVA – Variable Valve Actuation) appears a very robust and reliable approach to attain the above aim. In fact advanced valve strategies, such as Early Intake Valve Closure (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closure (LIVC), proved to be an effective way to decrease the fuel consumption: at part load through a reduction of the pumping work and, at high load, through a knock mitigation and an over-fueling reduction. In this paper, a comparative numerical study is realized to evaluate the influence of the intake valve strategy on the performance of a small-size turbocharged spark-ignition engine. The analyzed engine is equipped with a fully flexible VVA on the intake side, based on the “lost motion” principle and able to realize both EIVC and Full Lift strategies, while the virtual modification of the intake cam profile allows for the actuation of LIVC profiles. First, a 1D model of the tested engine is developed in GT-Power™ framework. It is integrated with in-house developed sub-models for the description of in-cylinder phenomena, including turbulence, combustion, knock and heat transfer. The adopted approach is validated against 3D turbulence results, measured global performance parameters and in-cylinder pressure cycles. The consistency of the proposed approach, without requiring any case-dependent tuning, is demonstrated at various speeds, loads and intake valve strategies. The validated engine model is used to perform a parametric analysis for different intake valve closure angles in two representative operating points at full and part load. The results point out that both EIVC and LIVC induce an improved fuel consumption with respect to a conventional Full Lift valve strategy. EIVC proves to be more effective at part load than LIVC, while similar BSFC advantages are obtained at high load. The proposed approach, based on refined sub-models for in-cylinder phenomena description, shows the capability to predict the effects of advanced valve strategies, making the implementation of a “virtual” calibration of a VVA engine possible.

Impact of intake valve strategies on fuel consumption and knock tendency of a spark ignition engine

Pirrello, Dino;Lanzafame, Rosario;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Nowadays various technical solutions have been proposed in order to improve the performance of spark-ignition internal combustion engines both at part and full load operations, especially in terms of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). Among the most advanced technical solutions, a fully flexible valve control system (VVA – Variable Valve Actuation) appears a very robust and reliable approach to attain the above aim. In fact advanced valve strategies, such as Early Intake Valve Closure (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closure (LIVC), proved to be an effective way to decrease the fuel consumption: at part load through a reduction of the pumping work and, at high load, through a knock mitigation and an over-fueling reduction. In this paper, a comparative numerical study is realized to evaluate the influence of the intake valve strategy on the performance of a small-size turbocharged spark-ignition engine. The analyzed engine is equipped with a fully flexible VVA on the intake side, based on the “lost motion” principle and able to realize both EIVC and Full Lift strategies, while the virtual modification of the intake cam profile allows for the actuation of LIVC profiles. First, a 1D model of the tested engine is developed in GT-Power™ framework. It is integrated with in-house developed sub-models for the description of in-cylinder phenomena, including turbulence, combustion, knock and heat transfer. The adopted approach is validated against 3D turbulence results, measured global performance parameters and in-cylinder pressure cycles. The consistency of the proposed approach, without requiring any case-dependent tuning, is demonstrated at various speeds, loads and intake valve strategies. The validated engine model is used to perform a parametric analysis for different intake valve closure angles in two representative operating points at full and part load. The results point out that both EIVC and LIVC induce an improved fuel consumption with respect to a conventional Full Lift valve strategy. EIVC proves to be more effective at part load than LIVC, while similar BSFC advantages are obtained at high load. The proposed approach, based on refined sub-models for in-cylinder phenomena description, shows the capability to predict the effects of advanced valve strategies, making the implementation of a “virtual” calibration of a VVA engine possible.
1D model; EIVC; Fuel consumption.; Knock tendency; LIVC; SI engine; Civil and Structural Engineering; Building and Construction; Energy (all); Mechanical Engineering; Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Impact of intake valve strategies on fuel consumption.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Dimensione 4.55 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.55 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/326205
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 52
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 36
social impact