Introduction: Epilepsy represents around 0.7% of the overall global burden of diseases and is particularly prevalent and associated with significant disability in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Latin American Countries (LAC). A community-based epilepsy awareness program was carried out by our group in the rural areas of the Chaco region, Plurinational state of Bolivia, to improve the knowledge about epilepsy, with a first part directed toward general practitioners and a second part toward nurses and community health workers (CHWs) of the rural communities with a positive outcome. The objective of the study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward epilepsy, the stigma related to epilepsy and the quality of life in people with epilepsy (PWE) before and after the interventional campaign directed toward representative members of the rural communities in the Chaco region in Bolivia. Methods: The study was conducted in three areas of Bolivia. Key subjects from each community were randomly selected. Before and after the courses they answered a questionnaire to assess their knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices about epilepsy, a validated Stigma Scale of Epilepsy (SSE) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-10 (QOLIE-10). Results: Two hundred sixteen subjects were involved in the program. Only 133 (61.6%) subjects completed the questionnaires a month after the educational program. A significant improvement was recorded in knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward epilepsy, and a significant reduction was found in the mean SSE total score (38.3 ± 14.7 vs. 28.5 ± 12.3; p < 0.01), reflecting a reduction of stigma levels. Regarding the quality of life, after the training, PWE stated to experience less depression, memory difficulties, work or social issues, and seizure worry. Conclusion: Our study confirms that continuous educational campaigns can lead to a significant change in the social perception and attitudes toward epilepsy.

Knowledge, stigma, and quality of life in epilepsy: Results before and after a community-based epilepsy awareness program in rural Bolivia

Giuliano, Loretta;Cicero, Calogero Edoardo;Sofia, Vito;Zappia, Mario;Nicoletti, Alessandra
2019

Abstract

Introduction: Epilepsy represents around 0.7% of the overall global burden of diseases and is particularly prevalent and associated with significant disability in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Latin American Countries (LAC). A community-based epilepsy awareness program was carried out by our group in the rural areas of the Chaco region, Plurinational state of Bolivia, to improve the knowledge about epilepsy, with a first part directed toward general practitioners and a second part toward nurses and community health workers (CHWs) of the rural communities with a positive outcome. The objective of the study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward epilepsy, the stigma related to epilepsy and the quality of life in people with epilepsy (PWE) before and after the interventional campaign directed toward representative members of the rural communities in the Chaco region in Bolivia. Methods: The study was conducted in three areas of Bolivia. Key subjects from each community were randomly selected. Before and after the courses they answered a questionnaire to assess their knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices about epilepsy, a validated Stigma Scale of Epilepsy (SSE) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-10 (QOLIE-10). Results: Two hundred sixteen subjects were involved in the program. Only 133 (61.6%) subjects completed the questionnaires a month after the educational program. A significant improvement was recorded in knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward epilepsy, and a significant reduction was found in the mean SSE total score (38.3 ± 14.7 vs. 28.5 ± 12.3; p < 0.01), reflecting a reduction of stigma levels. Regarding the quality of life, after the training, PWE stated to experience less depression, memory difficulties, work or social issues, and seizure worry. Conclusion: Our study confirms that continuous educational campaigns can lead to a significant change in the social perception and attitudes toward epilepsy.
Epilepsy; Health promotion; Tropical health; Neurology; Neurology (clinical); Behavioral Neuroscience
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/360293
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