Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of plasma cells (PC) in the bone marrow (BM), leading to bone loss and BM failure. Osteolytic bone disease is a common manifestation observed in MM patients and represents the most severe cause of morbidity, leading to progressive skeletal damage and disabilities. Pathogenetic mechanisms of MM bone disease are closely linked to PCs and osteoclast (OCs) hyperactivity, coupled with defective osteoblasts (OBs) function that is unable to counteract bone resorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Ixazomib, a third-generation proteasome inhibitor, on osteoclastogenesis and osteogenic differentiation. We found that Ixazomib was able to reduce differentiation of human monocytes into OCs and to inhibit the expression of OC markers when added to the OC medium. Concurrently, Ixazomib was able to stimulate osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), increasing osteogenic markers, either alone or in combination with the osteogenic medium. Given the key role of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling in bone homeostasis, we further investigated Ixazomib-induced SHH pathway activation. This set of experiments showed that Ixazomib, but not Bortezomib, was able to bind the Smoothened (SMO) receptor leading to nuclear translocation of GLI1 in human MSCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that PCs act as GLI1 suppressors on MSCs, thus reducing the potential of MSCs to differentiate in OBs. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that Ixazomib regulates bone remodeling by decreasing osteoclastogenesis and prompting osteoblast differentiation via the canonical SHH signaling pathway activation, thus, representing a promising therapeutic option to improve the complex pathological condition of MM patients.

Ixazomib improves bone remodeling and counteracts sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition mediated by myeloma cells

Tibullo D.;Vicario N.;Romano A.;Rosa M. D.;Barbagallo I.;Anfuso C. D.;Lupo G.;Parenti R.;Volti G. L.;Raimondo F. D.;Giallongo C.
2020

Abstract

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of plasma cells (PC) in the bone marrow (BM), leading to bone loss and BM failure. Osteolytic bone disease is a common manifestation observed in MM patients and represents the most severe cause of morbidity, leading to progressive skeletal damage and disabilities. Pathogenetic mechanisms of MM bone disease are closely linked to PCs and osteoclast (OCs) hyperactivity, coupled with defective osteoblasts (OBs) function that is unable to counteract bone resorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Ixazomib, a third-generation proteasome inhibitor, on osteoclastogenesis and osteogenic differentiation. We found that Ixazomib was able to reduce differentiation of human monocytes into OCs and to inhibit the expression of OC markers when added to the OC medium. Concurrently, Ixazomib was able to stimulate osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), increasing osteogenic markers, either alone or in combination with the osteogenic medium. Given the key role of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling in bone homeostasis, we further investigated Ixazomib-induced SHH pathway activation. This set of experiments showed that Ixazomib, but not Bortezomib, was able to bind the Smoothened (SMO) receptor leading to nuclear translocation of GLI1 in human MSCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that PCs act as GLI1 suppressors on MSCs, thus reducing the potential of MSCs to differentiate in OBs. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that Ixazomib regulates bone remodeling by decreasing osteoclastogenesis and prompting osteoblast differentiation via the canonical SHH signaling pathway activation, thus, representing a promising therapeutic option to improve the complex pathological condition of MM patients.
Bortezomib; GLI1; Ixazomib; Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC); Multiple myeloma (MM); Osteoblastogenesis; Osteoclastogenesis; Plasma cell (PC); Sonic hedgehog (SHH)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/384866
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