Brain damage is a complex dysfunction that involves a variety of conditions whose pathogenesis involves a number of mediators that lead to clinical sequelae. For this reason, the identification of specific circulating and/or tissue biomarkers which could indicate brain injury is challenging. This experimental study focused on microRNAs (miRNAs), a well-known diagnostic tool both in the clinical setting and in medico-legal investigation. Previous studies demonstrated that specific miRNAs (miR-21, miR-34, miR-124, miR-132, and miR-200b) control important target genes involved in neuronal apoptosis and neuronal stress-induced adaptation. Thus, in this experimental setting, their expression was evaluated in three selected groups of cadavers: drug abusers (cocaine), ischemic-stroke-related deaths, and aging damage in elder people who died from other neurological causes. The results demonstrated that the drug abuser group showed a higher expression of miR-132 and miR-34, suggesting a specific pathway in consumption-induced neurodegeneration. Instead, miR-200b and miR-21 dysregulation was linked to age-related cognitive impairment, and finally, stroke events and consequences were associated with an alteration in miR-200b, miR-21, and miR-124; significantly higher levels of this last expression are strongly sensitive for ischemic damage. Moreover, these results suggest that these expression patterns could be studied in other biological samples (plasma, urine) in subjects with brain injury linked to aging, drug abuse, and stroke to identify reliable biomarkers that could be applied in clinical practice. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm these interesting findings.

Human brain injury and mirnas: An experimental study

Sessa F.;Salerno M.;Montana A.;Ricci P.;Pomara C.
2019-01-01

Abstract

Brain damage is a complex dysfunction that involves a variety of conditions whose pathogenesis involves a number of mediators that lead to clinical sequelae. For this reason, the identification of specific circulating and/or tissue biomarkers which could indicate brain injury is challenging. This experimental study focused on microRNAs (miRNAs), a well-known diagnostic tool both in the clinical setting and in medico-legal investigation. Previous studies demonstrated that specific miRNAs (miR-21, miR-34, miR-124, miR-132, and miR-200b) control important target genes involved in neuronal apoptosis and neuronal stress-induced adaptation. Thus, in this experimental setting, their expression was evaluated in three selected groups of cadavers: drug abusers (cocaine), ischemic-stroke-related deaths, and aging damage in elder people who died from other neurological causes. The results demonstrated that the drug abuser group showed a higher expression of miR-132 and miR-34, suggesting a specific pathway in consumption-induced neurodegeneration. Instead, miR-200b and miR-21 dysregulation was linked to age-related cognitive impairment, and finally, stroke events and consequences were associated with an alteration in miR-200b, miR-21, and miR-124; significantly higher levels of this last expression are strongly sensitive for ischemic damage. Moreover, these results suggest that these expression patterns could be studied in other biological samples (plasma, urine) in subjects with brain injury linked to aging, drug abuse, and stroke to identify reliable biomarkers that could be applied in clinical practice. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm these interesting findings.
2019
Aging
Brain injury
Cocaine
MiR-124
MiR-132
MiR-200b
MiR-21
MiR-34
MiRNA
Stroke
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Injuries
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Male
MicroRNAs
Middle Aged
Young Adult
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/487108
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