Postural balance is an important but not well-studied concept in the treatment of adolescent scoliosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether conservative treatment with Sforzesco bracing induced negative perturbations on postural stability, as related to static, postural, and dynamic baropodometric indicators. Twelve subjects (12 females, aged 11-16) with moderate AIS, were selected among a group of 97 patients. Inclusion criteria were: (1) confirmed diagnosis of moderate AIS (Cobb angle of 21 degrees to 35 degrees for the primary curve); (2) thoracic or thoracolumbar primary curve; (3) skeletal immaturity with growth cartilage visible on pretreatment radiographs (Risser < 5); (4) chronological age between 11 and 16 years; and (5) Sforzesco bracing treatment. All patients underwent a physical examination and radiological measurements with anteroposterior and lateral scans. Static, postural, and dynamic assessments were performed twice by barefoot patients, with and without Sforzesco bracing. Comparison between demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data highlighted a homogeneity of the sample. We evaluated the point of maximum pressure with and without bracing and found no statistically significant differences (p value = 0.22). In postural measurements, the laterolateral oscillations, anteroposterior oscillations, and average speed of oscillations were evaluated, comparing measurements with and without bracing. There were no statistically significant differences, except for the mean rate of oscillation, which was slightly increased in the recordings with a brace compared to those without a brace, p value = 0.045. Our findings show no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in static, postural, and dynamic baropodometric indicators

The Incidence of Bracing Treatment on Static and Dynamic Baropodometric Parameters in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Pavone, Vito
Primo
;
Caldaci, Alessia;Mangano, Giulia Rita Agata;Maria, Fabrizio Di;Panvini, Flora Maria Chiara;Sapienza, Marco;Vescio, Andrea;Roggio, Federico;Musumeci, Giuseppe;Testa, Gianluca
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Postural balance is an important but not well-studied concept in the treatment of adolescent scoliosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether conservative treatment with Sforzesco bracing induced negative perturbations on postural stability, as related to static, postural, and dynamic baropodometric indicators. Twelve subjects (12 females, aged 11-16) with moderate AIS, were selected among a group of 97 patients. Inclusion criteria were: (1) confirmed diagnosis of moderate AIS (Cobb angle of 21 degrees to 35 degrees for the primary curve); (2) thoracic or thoracolumbar primary curve; (3) skeletal immaturity with growth cartilage visible on pretreatment radiographs (Risser < 5); (4) chronological age between 11 and 16 years; and (5) Sforzesco bracing treatment. All patients underwent a physical examination and radiological measurements with anteroposterior and lateral scans. Static, postural, and dynamic assessments were performed twice by barefoot patients, with and without Sforzesco bracing. Comparison between demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data highlighted a homogeneity of the sample. We evaluated the point of maximum pressure with and without bracing and found no statistically significant differences (p value = 0.22). In postural measurements, the laterolateral oscillations, anteroposterior oscillations, and average speed of oscillations were evaluated, comparing measurements with and without bracing. There were no statistically significant differences, except for the mean rate of oscillation, which was slightly increased in the recordings with a brace compared to those without a brace, p value = 0.045. Our findings show no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in static, postural, and dynamic baropodometric indicators
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/539420
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