Simple Summary There is accumulating evidence that gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with the etiopathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from the onset of the disease to the progressive stages of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Furthermore, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have shown promise in restoring dysbiosis and lowering clinical indicators of disease in a number of trials, both preclinical and clinical. Additionally, postbiotics and parabiotics have recently garnered some attention. The purpose of this bibliometric analysis was to assess, using the Dimensions database, recent publishing trends concerning the role of the gut microbiome, in the progression of NAFLD into NASH and cirrhosis, and its connection with biotics (prebiotics, probiotics, symbiotics, postbiotics, and parabiotics).There is growing evidence that gut microbiota dysbiosis is linked to the etiopathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from the initial stage of disease until the progressive stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and the final stage of cirrhosis. Conversely, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have shown promise in restoring dysbiosis and lowering clinical indicators of disease in a number of both preclinical and clinical studies. Additionally, postbiotics and parabiotics have recently garnered some attention. The purpose of this bibliometric analysis is to assess recent publishing trends concerning the role of the gut microbiome in the progression of NAFLD, NASH and cirrhosis and its connection with biotics. The free access version of the Dimensions scientific research database was used to find publications in this field from 2002 to 2022. VOSviewer and Dimensions' integrated tools were used to analyze current research trends. Research into the following topics is expected to emerge in this field: (1) evaluation of risk factors which are correlated with the progression of NAFLD, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome; (2) pathogenic mechanisms, such as liver inflammation through toll-like receptors activation, or alteration of short-chain fatty acids metabolisms, which contribute to NAFLD development and its progression in more severe forms, such as cirrhosis; (3) therapy for cirrhosis through dysbiosis reduction, and research on hepatic encephalopathy a common consequence of cirrhosis; (4) evaluation of diversity, and composition of gut microbiome under NAFLD, and as it varies under NASH and cirrhosis by rRNA gene sequencing, a tool which can also be used for the development of new probiotics and explore into the impact of biotics on the gut microbiome; (5) treatments to reduce dysbiosis with new probiotics, such as Akkermansia, or with fecal microbiome transplantation.

Gut Microbiome in the Progression of NAFLD, NASH and Cirrhosis, and Its Connection with Biotics: A Bibliometric Study Using Dimensions Scientific Research Database

Pezzino, Salvatore;Castorina, Sergio;Puleo, Stefano;Barchitta, Martina;Agodi, Antonella;Gallo, Luisa;La Greca, Gaetano;Latteri, Saverio
2023-01-01

Abstract

Simple Summary There is accumulating evidence that gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with the etiopathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from the onset of the disease to the progressive stages of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Furthermore, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have shown promise in restoring dysbiosis and lowering clinical indicators of disease in a number of trials, both preclinical and clinical. Additionally, postbiotics and parabiotics have recently garnered some attention. The purpose of this bibliometric analysis was to assess, using the Dimensions database, recent publishing trends concerning the role of the gut microbiome, in the progression of NAFLD into NASH and cirrhosis, and its connection with biotics (prebiotics, probiotics, symbiotics, postbiotics, and parabiotics).There is growing evidence that gut microbiota dysbiosis is linked to the etiopathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from the initial stage of disease until the progressive stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and the final stage of cirrhosis. Conversely, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have shown promise in restoring dysbiosis and lowering clinical indicators of disease in a number of both preclinical and clinical studies. Additionally, postbiotics and parabiotics have recently garnered some attention. The purpose of this bibliometric analysis is to assess recent publishing trends concerning the role of the gut microbiome in the progression of NAFLD, NASH and cirrhosis and its connection with biotics. The free access version of the Dimensions scientific research database was used to find publications in this field from 2002 to 2022. VOSviewer and Dimensions' integrated tools were used to analyze current research trends. Research into the following topics is expected to emerge in this field: (1) evaluation of risk factors which are correlated with the progression of NAFLD, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome; (2) pathogenic mechanisms, such as liver inflammation through toll-like receptors activation, or alteration of short-chain fatty acids metabolisms, which contribute to NAFLD development and its progression in more severe forms, such as cirrhosis; (3) therapy for cirrhosis through dysbiosis reduction, and research on hepatic encephalopathy a common consequence of cirrhosis; (4) evaluation of diversity, and composition of gut microbiome under NAFLD, and as it varies under NASH and cirrhosis by rRNA gene sequencing, a tool which can also be used for the development of new probiotics and explore into the impact of biotics on the gut microbiome; (5) treatments to reduce dysbiosis with new probiotics, such as Akkermansia, or with fecal microbiome transplantation.
2023
Dimensions database
NAFLD
NASH
VOSviewer
bibliometric analysis
biotics
cirrhosis
gut microbiome
prebiotic
probiotic
symbiotic
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/570409
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