: Ovarian cancer (OC) remains a significant health challenge globally, with high mortality rates despite advancements in treatment. Emerging research suggests a potential link between OC development and genital dysbiosis, implicating alterations in the microbiome composition as a contributing factor. To investigate this correlation, a meta-analysis was conducted following PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines, involving eight studies encompassing 3504 patients. Studies investigating the role of upper and inferior genital tract dysbiosis were included, with particular reference to HPV infection and/or history of pelvic inflammatory disease. The analysis revealed no significant difference in genital dysbiosis prevalence between OC patients and healthy controls. Although previous literature suggests associations between dysbiosis and gynecologic cancers, such as cervical and endometrial cancers, the findings regarding OC are inconclusive. Methodological variations and environmental factors may contribute to these discrepancies, underscoring the need for standardized methodologies and larger-scale studies. Despite the limitations, understanding the microbiome's role in OC development holds promise for informing preventive and therapeutic strategies. A holistic approach to patient care, incorporating microbiome monitoring and personalized interventions, may offer insights into mitigating OC risk and improving treatment outcomes. Further research with robust methodologies is warranted to elucidate the complex interplay between dysbiosis and OC, potentially paving the way for novel preventive and therapeutic approaches.

Exploring the Relationship between Ovarian Cancer and Genital Microbiota: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Marco Palumbo;Cinzia Lucia Randazzo
Project Administration
;
Alessandra Pino
Supervision
;
2024-01-01

Abstract

: Ovarian cancer (OC) remains a significant health challenge globally, with high mortality rates despite advancements in treatment. Emerging research suggests a potential link between OC development and genital dysbiosis, implicating alterations in the microbiome composition as a contributing factor. To investigate this correlation, a meta-analysis was conducted following PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines, involving eight studies encompassing 3504 patients. Studies investigating the role of upper and inferior genital tract dysbiosis were included, with particular reference to HPV infection and/or history of pelvic inflammatory disease. The analysis revealed no significant difference in genital dysbiosis prevalence between OC patients and healthy controls. Although previous literature suggests associations between dysbiosis and gynecologic cancers, such as cervical and endometrial cancers, the findings regarding OC are inconclusive. Methodological variations and environmental factors may contribute to these discrepancies, underscoring the need for standardized methodologies and larger-scale studies. Despite the limitations, understanding the microbiome's role in OC development holds promise for informing preventive and therapeutic strategies. A holistic approach to patient care, incorporating microbiome monitoring and personalized interventions, may offer insights into mitigating OC risk and improving treatment outcomes. Further research with robust methodologies is warranted to elucidate the complex interplay between dysbiosis and OC, potentially paving the way for novel preventive and therapeutic approaches.
2024
cancerogenesis
gynecological cancer
gynecological microenvironment
microbiota
ovarian cancer
ovarian malignancy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11769/608249
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